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Share ideas and talk about research papers from Marywood and Tomsk Professors

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  1. Kaitlyn permalink
    January 20, 2011 5:53 pm

    Hello, John Lemoncelli, my question is for you. Is it possible for someone to fully overcome the “parasite”? If possible, is there an average age where these victims begin their healing process?

  2. Kate permalink
    January 20, 2011 5:55 pm

    John Meza, many people state that they are not creative. Do you feel that everyone has a creative side? If so, are these people just not using the right techniques to access it, or are they aware they can be creative but afraid to push through the “mental blocks?”

    • John Meza permalink
      March 8, 2011 2:19 am

      Kate,

      I believe that everyone has a certain amount of creativity “DNA” in them. However, the inherent amount can vary greatly in depth and scope. Some people are born left or right brain dominant, which I believe can greatly affect the person’s outlook on creativity from the start. Studies have shown that the main difference between creative and non-creative people is a self full-filling belief. Creative people thought of themselves as being creative and were naturally uninhibited, and conversely the others believed that they were not creative, and prematurely defeated themselves when challenged. Basically, it boils down to a belief in yourself, or not. But there’s more to it than that.

      Creativity is an outlook that must be fostered, fertilized, and exercised on a regular basis. Through the practice of mental exercises and activities, and an increase in one’s self awareness, and through self discipline, I believe one can greatly increase their ability to become more creative. There are different levels of creativity, ranging from simple childhood expression to emergent genius. Keep in mind however, not everyone can or will be able to rise to the top and become an Einstein or DaVinci.

      Too numerous to list here, there are several influences silently working against most people, they include: cultural, emotional, and perceptual or mental blocks. I can send you a hard copy list of the different blocks if you are interested.

      I hope this helped shed some light on your question.

      John

  3. Jess permalink
    January 28, 2011 6:10 pm

    Concerning Dr. B Janey’s Research,
    In your research you mentioned supervision as an opportunity for growth. The process of supervision in itself lends towards interaction and the opportunity to further develop skills of interaction and expression. Even though supervision’s primary purpose is to protect the clients, I believe it can prevent mediocrity in service and reduce potential for burnout in the therapeutic profession. Do you agree that throughout one’s career, continuous supervision is not only beneficial, enabling the safety of clients, but simultaneously allows for the continued advancement of the clinician in characteristics that are essential to the therapeutic field?

    • Dr. Janey permalink
      March 15, 2011 7:25 pm

      Hello Jess, and thank you for your question.

      I do indeed agree that continuous supervision is beneficial, and it can protect the clinician from burn-out. This is a perennial concern in both Clinical Psychology, and Counseling.

      In an idea situation, a clinician is receiving good quality supervision every week, or bi-weekly after they complete their formal education. This can prove problematic after graduation, however. Not all work settings can offer the luxury of continued supervision. Sometimes it is just not practical. That can leave someone feeling rather isolated.

      In these kinds of situations, it can be very helpful to stay in touch with your teachers from your training program, to occasionally consult about your current cases. This is no substitute for weekly or even monthly supervision at your work site, but it can be enough to keep a clinician from the mediocrity and burn out that you describe.

      This is also where professional organizations can play an important role. Sometimes the annual gathering of other clinicians at professional conferences can refresh your skills and your knowledge base, so that you may continue to grow and develop.

  4. Jessica permalink
    January 28, 2011 6:50 pm

    Dr. Chastokolenko’s description of trans-art extending beyond stereotypical behavior, reflects a theme of the art therapy profession. The creative process involves working with the unconscious to bring the inside emotions and experiences out into a visual format. It contradicts modern society which relies on verbal language, and instead stresses a visual formation of communication.

  5. Amy permalink
    February 11, 2011 8:24 pm

    This question is for Dr. Lemoncelli-
    your research is strongly based in the clients spiritual beliefs. Have you ever struggled working with those that wish to void their life of a religion, or a higher power. Do you feel that these individuals will still be reached through your parasite model with the same impact of those that have a stronger faith in God?

  6. Amy permalink
    February 11, 2011 8:47 pm

    This question is for Dr. Ahmed-
    Have you done any of your research with families with adopted children? I would be interested to see the similarities between families step-parent/step-child relations and those of parents with an adopted child. Would it be likely that you would see some of the same characteristics in these relationships?

  7. Amy permalink
    February 11, 2011 9:30 pm

    this question is for professor Klochko-
    can you further explain the “the external field” of a person being inalienable from a person. I am uncertain what you mean by this in regards to the psyche and consciousness.

  8. Amy permalink
    February 11, 2011 11:52 pm

    This question is for Dr. Krasnorjadtseva-
    I am interested in your concept of the “attributing sense”. Can you further explain how it relates to young people and their higher level of sensitivity to problems, as well as their life fullfillment and self-actualization.

  9. Clarissa permalink
    February 14, 2011 11:51 pm

    Dr. Krasnoryadtseva, could you explain a little bit more about what you saw in your research regarding the strategy of “attributing sense”? Could you give a “real world” example of how it is used?

  10. February 15, 2011 12:12 am

    This question is for Dr. Krasnorjadtseva-
    Can you elaborate on the galvanic skin response and correlation with emotion?

  11. Clarissa permalink
    February 15, 2011 12:23 am

    Dr. Klochko, could you please describe some more of what an educational system that allows a child to develop a “soverign personality” would look like? What kinds of teaching styles and experiences would be important to include?

  12. Clarissa permalink
    February 15, 2011 12:38 am

    Dr. Lemoncelli, how did you come to the conclusion that it is necessary to adjust a patient’s view of God in order for healing to take place? Have you experienced resistance from patients who profess athiesm? Do different religious backgrounds offer different challenges (or perhaps “flavors” is a better word) to treatment?

  13. February 15, 2011 12:43 am

    This question is for Dr. Ahmed-
    In regard teenage mothers, I would be intersted in knowing more about grandparents assuming the primary parental role, and how this can affect relationships within the family dynamic.

    • April 13, 2011 7:18 pm

      Hi Mandy
      We say we are blessed when the grandparents are available our childern. The grandparent should operate from outside the immediate family circle. A healthy family relationship will be when the immediate family is inside the circle and the grand parents operate from outside. Once the grand parents gets into the inner circle then enmeshment and fusion will occur and the gradparent might take over the role of a parent which is considered not healthy. There will be power struggle between parent and grand parent and the teen age mother will not have a good role model.

  14. Rachel permalink
    February 15, 2011 12:45 am

    Dr. Klochko-
    I am interested in your ideas about meaning formation. I’m noticing that your observation of meaning systems and how they relate to subjective reality sounds similar to cognitive behavioral therapy in its belief that the way in which we perceive events forms our attitudes about those events. Is there a link between meaning systems and CBT?

  15. Clarissa permalink
    February 15, 2011 12:55 am

    Dr. Ahmed, part of your research touches on the “cycle of poverty” in families. Has your research uncovered exceptions to this phenomenon, which might offer insight into ways to break the cycle?

  16. Rachel permalink
    February 15, 2011 1:00 am

    Dr. Krasnoryadtseva,
    I noticed that in your research involving young people and their problem solving abilities, you stated that those who were sensitive to problems tended to ignore them, while those who had less negative feelings about problems searched for a solution. Were there any participants who equally ignored some problems while solving others?

  17. Rachel permalink
    February 15, 2011 1:10 am

    Dr. Ahmed,
    I noticed that most of the research on step-family therapy is structured on strengthening the “new family”. Is it ever beneficial to have both biological parents and one or more step-parent(s) involved in therapy sessions with the child, or would that only create more confusion regarding the familial relationships?

    • April 13, 2011 7:22 pm

      Hi Rachel
      Absolutely, research shows and I believe that it is significant to have a step parent in therapy sessions. It is collaborative effort and decision made by the therapist and the family members attending the sessionw when they want a step parent to be involved. Once a safe climate is created then the step parent can be brought in to complete the process.

  18. Rachel permalink
    February 15, 2011 1:22 am

    Dr. Lemoncelli,
    It is my understanding that some victims of abuse struggle with accepting the idea of a higher power for the same reason that many others whom have not been subject to abuse also struggle with. I am referring to those who claim, “If there was a God, he would have stopped this from happening to me.” How do you approach clients who hold this belief?

  19. Emilee permalink
    February 15, 2011 2:51 am

    This question is for Dr. Lemoncelli-

    You describe the importance of addressing the role of spirituality in these client’s life; How do you approach a client who has rejected their faith to their trauma, or clients who label themselves atheist? Do you encourage them to explore the possibilities of a spiritual life? Or do you consider the issue irrelevant and move on?

  20. Emilee permalink
    February 15, 2011 2:55 am

    This question is for Dr. Ahmed-

    Can you further explain what Coley & Chase-Lansdale (1998, p. 153) mean by the “perceived costs of early motherhood” in regards to teenage pregnancy?

  21. February 15, 2011 4:52 pm

    This question is for Dr. Lemoncelli-
    I also find your research to be deeply rooted in sprirituality, but is their supported evidence of someone overcoming the “parasite” without a sense of spirituality or religious affiliation?

  22. February 15, 2011 5:04 pm

    This question is for Dr. Klochko-

    Can you explain the “Pretersensual dimensions of objects constituting the external field” a bit further? Can you also explain what the axiomatic basis of cultural-historic theory is about?

  23. Emilee permalink
    February 15, 2011 7:55 pm

    This question is for Dr. Klochko-

    Can you further explain what you mean by “innovative behaviour” and ” open self-organizing system”? Can you give examples?

  24. Emilee permalink
    February 15, 2011 9:02 pm

    This question is for Dr. Krasnoryadtseva-

    Am I correct in my understandings that in your research you found that people with high sensitivity to problems were better able to ignore negative feelings and emotions thus more able to analyze and resolve the problem, while people with lower sensitivity to problems were less likely to seek help from others when trying to solve the problem?

    Can you then say that people with higher sensitivity are more aware of difficult situations thus more proactive and resourceful in resolving the issue?

  25. Jessica Kehl permalink
    February 15, 2011 10:19 pm

    Dr. Klochko,
    From what I gathered through reading your research, and I may be very off base here, is that these theories sound very similar to cognitive behavioral psychology, and the idea that we “create” our own realities, or we are open to allowing influence into the construction of our own personal realities. I understand that cognitive behavioral psychology is very person based, and from my understanding of what you have said you are interested more so in the function of the psyche itself. My only question is how would you tangibly go about studying the function of the psyche, aside from taking a reflection, person, or theoretical approach?

  26. Jessica Kehl permalink
    February 15, 2011 10:58 pm

    Dr. Kransnoryadtseva,
    I have more of a clarification type question. Your research sounds very similar to studies done on resilience, coping and problem solving strategies. I was wondering just for clarification, if you’re more interested in studying the actual problem solving strategies, or the origins of sensitivity in the person that contributes to their actions, or is this more of a correlational study between the two?

  27. Jessica Kehl permalink
    February 15, 2011 11:09 pm

    Dr. Ahmed,
    In regards to the idea of the “cycle of poverty” is there any particular element either within the individual or the whole family interaction that you believe is a primary contributing factor in families who have been able to break this cycle?

  28. Jessica Kehl permalink
    February 15, 2011 11:21 pm

    Dr. Lemoncelli,
    I was wondering if the idea of the “parasite” is always connected to that feeling of personal responsibility that abused patients can feel? Have you found that those who have been abused always have to have some level of feeling responsible for their own trauma? Is it possible that this personal responsibility is solely unconsciously rooted, if so, how would you go about working with a patient to bring these unconscious feelings to the foreground in order to begin to work through them?

  29. Cassandra permalink
    February 15, 2011 11:26 pm

    In regards to Dr. Klochko, could you further explain your meaning with how the “system, developmental and determinism principles lose their autonomy when a self-organizing
    system becomes the subject of the science?”

  30. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    February 16, 2011 1:22 am

    This question is directed to: Dr. Vitaly klochko, Dr. Shamshad Ahmed, & Dr. John Lemoncelli

    Do you think that our individualistic ideals as a culture, influence the “reactions” to the difficult experiences in life in general?

  31. Cassandra permalink
    February 16, 2011 1:36 am

    To Dr. Krasnorjadtseva –
    Could you give one or two other examples of coping strategies and their correlations with general sensitivity problems according to your finding in the “Participant of the Youth Scientific-Innovative Contest”?

  32. Paul permalink
    February 16, 2011 1:36 am

    Dr. Lemoncelli,
    Does research show that the age of the victim at the time of treatment relate to the likelihood that they would become an abuser? Also, does the severity of abuse increase the probability of victims becoming abusers themselves?

  33. Paul permalink
    February 16, 2011 1:44 am

    Dr. Ahmed,
    In your opinion, could all families at one time or another be considered dysfunctional?

    • April 13, 2011 7:25 pm

      Hi Paul, good question. Most families are functional in a dysfunctional situation. And there are some families who are dysfuntctional in a functional situation. The therapsit helps families identify the functional and dysfunctional dynamics

  34. Paul permalink
    February 16, 2011 1:52 am

    Dr. Krasnorjadtseva,
    How is the sensitivity to problems learned? Is it temperament? Family structure and how they were raised? Does one become more sensitive when they have more experience with problems, challenges and hardships?

  35. Paul permalink
    February 16, 2011 2:18 am

    Dr. Klochko,
    You mentioned the crisis in modern psychology, can you go into more detail about that? Is it a conflict of science and religion?
    And do you personally believe it’s necessary to define the function of the psyche?

  36. Rachel B permalink
    February 16, 2011 2:36 am

    Dr. Klochko, this question is for you. Do you actively search for meaning in your own anthropological psychology, and if so, how to do you go about doing that? How can we as students with a much smaller understanding of your concepts further familiarize ourselves?

  37. Cassandra permalink
    February 16, 2011 2:47 am

    Dr. Lemoncelli, if you could, how do you briefly define forgiveness? And is there a difference for those who have a faith and those who don’t?

  38. Rachel B permalink
    February 16, 2011 4:38 am

    These questions are for Dr. Krasnorjadtseva. What are some populations, or demographics of some of the clients you’ve applied attributing sense or initiative goal-setting? In what type of setting do you typically work with these clients? What are some “blocks” you have to overcome with tough clients?

    What is the difference between a cognitive contradiction and a defence mechanism? Do you mean this as a form of cognitive avoidance? I am unclear what you mean by these terms. Can you please give case study examples for these questions? Thank you.

  39. Rachel B permalink
    February 16, 2011 5:29 am

    This question is for Dr Ahmed. You talk about psycho-educational programs designed to help family members understand common stepfamily relationship patterns and differences. What type of setting does this take place and are there adjuct services that these clients can utilize such as therapy?

    I wonder how these families know that this program is available to them, and how effective it is when there are children who are resistent.
    Thank you.

  40. Cassandra permalink
    February 17, 2011 12:14 am

    To Dr. Ahmed,
    In your research, what solution or therapeutic process have you found that produces the best outcome in breaking the cycle you described with impoverished dysfunctional families?

    • April 13, 2011 7:28 pm

      Hi Cassandra
      Its the Narrative Family Therapy- the family members are encouraged to shre their personal, collective and cultural narratives. These narratives help them look into the origins of their belief system and work on their irrational beliefs

  41. Clarissa permalink
    March 21, 2011 2:16 am

    Dr. Matsuta,
    This is a really fascinating topic. Thank you for sharing it with us. I was wondering, do you think that it might be a good idea to train those people who think that autocommunication is “unnatural” so that they realize the benefits of it? What might that training look like? Can an individual’s autocommuncation be improved?

  42. Clarissa permalink
    March 21, 2011 2:42 am

    Dr. Muse-Burke,
    I have seen and experienced some resistance and hostility within the religious community of any sort of psychology/counseling which isn’t strictly concerned with only the spiritual aspects of a person. This seems like a hinderance to the desire you’ve expressed to integrate spirituality into “secular” counseling. Have you seen this? How would you suggest that this be dealth with? What might you advise clients who might feel “stuck in the middle”?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 1:21 am

      Dear Clarissa,

      Thank you for your question. Although I’ve not directly experienced resistance to counseling or psychotherapy from religious communities, I am aware such resistance exists. I think there are several means by which the mental health professions can actively reach out to religious groups and help to reduce resistance. First, mental health professionals are often accurately viewed as anti-religious. As such, it is imperative that training programs integrate religiosity/spirituality training into their curriculum to ensure mental health professionals can effectively work with religious or spiritual clients. Knowing there are competent clinicians who value working with religious and spiritual clients will help to bridge the gap. Second, mental health professionals are encouraged to actively consult with religious leaders when counseling religious clients. Demonstrating respect and value to religious clergy during consultation might have long-lasting impact on the willingness of clergy to refer their congregants for counseling. Third, mental health professionals should be willing to refer clients to the appropriate clergy when concerns are faith/spirituality focused rather than related to mental health concerns. As mental health professionals, it is crucial that we understand the limits of our competence and refer appropriately.

      In terms of clients who might feel stuck between their counseling and faith, I would ask them to talk about the benefits and challenges presented by counseling and faith. I would inquire about how they might be compatible for them and encourage them to respect the complexity of the two rather than view them in “black and white” or “right and wrong” terms. If it would be helpful, we could also practice how they might express their beliefs and feelings with others who are less supportive of their counseling or faith.

      I hope that I’ve answered your question in a helpful way. Thank you, again.

      JLMB

  43. Clarissa permalink
    March 21, 2011 2:31 pm

    D. Balanev,
    Why do you think that it is that psychology is not involved in the development of techology? How might you propose that this be changed?

  44. Amy permalink
    March 21, 2011 5:02 pm

    This question is for Dr. Muse-Burke,
    Is it important to include both spirituality and religiousity into our practice? Can one be incorporated effectively in treatment without the other?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 1:29 am

      Dear Amy,

      Thank you for your question. I believe it is crucial that mental health professionals are competent to incorporate both religion and spirituality into their clinical practice. Diversity training during graduate school should include a discussion of religion and spirituality, helping counselors-in-training to understand how they might effectively assess and incorporate spirituality and faith in their work with clients. Since most clients who seek mental health services believe in God or affiliate with a religion, this is a key competency for clinicians.

      Importantly, however, the degree to which religion and/or spirituality are included in the counseling relationship will vary from one client to the next. The therapist should inquire in the first session about the client’s religious and/or spiritual background and its importance to the client. That will help dictate the extent to which it will be included in the counseling work. Likewise, it is possible that only religion or spirituality will be integrated into the work, depending on how the client identifies. Throughout the counseling process, it will be important for the clinician to inquire about how the client feels about how spirituality and/or religion are being included, and the therapist should adjust accordingly.

      I hope that my response is helpful to you. Thank you for your question.
      JLMB

  45. Amy permalink
    March 21, 2011 5:17 pm

    Dr. Balanev,
    Has your research or others research focused on the generational effects of computer technology and psychology? Have differences been discovered between older generations with limited technological knowledge and younger generations where technology is often a key comonent to a way of everyday living?

  46. Amy permalink
    March 21, 2011 6:09 pm

    Dr. Janey
    In review of your research I didn’t see emphasis on the well-being of the client. Do you feel that the supervisor-supervisee relationship and dynamics of this supervisonary relationship can have an effect (either good or bad) on the well-being of the client/patient? How so?

    • Roland3337 permalink
      March 23, 2011 3:52 am

      Thank you for your question, Amy.

      The well-being of the client of paramount importance, and is placed ahead of the training needs of the supervisee. The supervision relationship is best conceptualized as an additional layer of care and protection for the client. Therefore, by definition, the effect of supervision for the client, should produce better outcomes, compared to ineffective supervision, or no supervision at all.

      An might be counter-transference: i.e., the therapist is having a reaction to the client of some kind, usually emotional. An effective supervisor will notice this, and work with the therapist to manage the effects of this counter-transference in a way that will maximize client benefits (note that the therapist will benefit as well in this example).

      An ineffective supervisor either would miss this dynamic, or not interpret it in a useful way. An important clinical situation becomes a missed opportunity for growth, in terms of the therapist, and also for the client. Or worse, if not managed properly, the client could actually come to harm, which has obvious consequences for the relationship between the supervisor and for the therapist.

    • Dr. Janey permalink
      March 23, 2011 3:53 am

      Thank you for your question, Amy.

      The well-being of the client of paramount importance, and is placed ahead of the training needs of the supervisee. The supervision relationship is best conceptualized as an additional layer of care and protection for the client. Therefore, by definition, the effect of supervision for the client, should produce better outcomes, compared to ineffective supervision, or no supervision at all.

      An might be counter-transference: i.e., the therapist is having a reaction to the client of some kind, usually emotional. An effective supervisor will notice this, and work with the therapist to manage the effects of this counter-transference in a way that will maximize client benefits (note that the therapist will benefit as well in this example).

      An ineffective supervisor either would miss this dynamic, or not interpret it in a useful way. An important clinical situation becomes a missed opportunity for growth, in terms of the therapist, and also for the client. Or worse, if not managed properly, the client could actually come to harm, which has obvious consequences for the relationship between the supervisor and for the therapist.

  47. Amy permalink
    March 21, 2011 7:16 pm

    Dr. Matsuta-
    Do you feel the creative process can be incorporated effectively into the concept of autocommunication? Can the expression through visual arts be used as a means to further clarify a person’s self-talk and inner speech?

  48. Emilee permalink
    March 21, 2011 9:22 pm

    Dr. Muse-Burke

    Though your research focuses on the positive outcomes of incorporating spirituality and religiousity into counseling, you also site that through spiritual assessment a counselor could find that a clients religious orientation can be hindering. How do you suggest counselors address this kind of unhealthy spiritual/religious orientation?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 1:37 am

      Dear Emilee,

      Thank you for your thoughtful question. I would encourage a therapist to approach an unhealthy spiritual/religious orientation in a way similar to any other unhealthy behavior, decision, or relationship. The first priority (as always) is to develop a strong working alliance with the client. To that end, the counselor and client need to address the goals of counseling and whether working on the unhealthy religious/spiritual orientation is important to the client.

      Next, the counselor needs to develop a thorough understanding of the client’s spiritual/religious orientation and the meaning it holds for the client. How does the client think and feel about her or his religion/spirituality? What role does it play in her or his life? What would it be like for the client to disconnect from an unhealthy orientation? If, after thorough assessment, it seems clear to both the client and counselor that the orientation needs to change, they would work collaboratively to consider the best way to make the change while maintaining the health and well-being of the client. Often times, these changes do not need to be absolute, such as cutting oneself from one’s religion. Rather, it involves developing a new, healthier relationship with one’s faith or spirituality. Finding that middle ground can be most meaningful for clients.

      I hope that’s helpful to you.
      JLMB

  49. March 21, 2011 9:31 pm

    Dr. Muse-Burke,

    I find that a the subject of religiosity is more of a sensitive subject than that of spirituality. I believe that people can have a strong sense of spirituality without practicing a specific religion. There seems to be some prejudice in different cultures about the “religion” that some practice. Have you encountered this in treatment?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 1:48 am

      Dear Mandy,

      Thank you for your interesting question. In fact, the prejudice that I have experienced has come from psychologists and counselors-in-training toward clients. In one example, I supervised a student who was completing an assessment on a client. The client’s spirituality was outside the mainstream, and the therapist (another student) and her supervisor (not me) believed that the client was psychotic because of the spiritual beliefs he discussed. As such, my student and I incorporated spiritual assessment into the battery of tests, and we determined that he was not psychotic.

      In another example, while I was a trainee, I was working with a client who was exploring the world religions to find one that was a good fit for her. Knowing that I am a person of faith, one of my peers in group supervision challenged me, suggested that I was imposing my religiosity onto the client by encouraging her to work on her goal. This student was anti-religion, and he did not see the value in helping the client work toward finding meaningful religious affiliation.

      I hope this answers the question for you.
      JLMB

  50. Emilee permalink
    March 21, 2011 9:42 pm

    Dr. Janey

    would you also describe clinical supervision a 50-50 partnership between the supervisor and supervisee in terms of responsibilities in contributing to a productive relationship? Or does the supervisor, usually the senior, well-practiced professional have more responsibility in ensuring the supervisees needs are being met?

    • Dr. Janey permalink
      March 23, 2011 4:05 am

      Thank you for your question, Emilee.

      There is certainly some vicarious liability in supervision, which is mentioned in my paper. So a supervisor does have some responsibility in client outcomes. Whether or not it amounts to an even 50/50 split would be highly dependent on the dynamics of individual cases.

      If there was a malpractice case that resulted in some kind of sanction for the therapist, the amount of liability for the supervisor , if he or she is named as a co-defendant, would depend on the details. It might be 50%. It might be more. Or it might be less.

  51. March 21, 2011 9:51 pm

    Dr. Janey,

    As a student and having practicums supervisors, I have encountered other students that don’t agree with their supervisors way of practicing or treatment methods. As a student we are learning and supervisors understand that we may make errors. I find your research interesting, having been in placements, and experiencing this. What would happen if a supervisor had made a clinical error and the student knew it was morally or ethically wrong. What should a student do in this type of situation?

    • Dr. Janey permalink
      March 23, 2011 4:18 am

      Hello Mandy. Thanks for your question.

      Supervisors and their supervisees will not always agree. Conflicts can come up. Indeed, if the relationship is completely free from conflict, I would suspect either impression management from the student, or a lack of attentiveness from the supervisor. Hopefully, when a disagreement comes up, a strong working alliance between the two will exist, so that the issue can be handled professionally, in a way that both the therapist and the client will ultimately benefit.

      The implication here, is that the first point of contact is ideally with the supervisor in question, especially if there is a clinical disagreement. In the case of a blatant ethical violation on the part of the supervisor, in any suspected misconduct, things are a bit more complicated.

      If I were in this position, I would first consult with a third party. In an educational setting, that might be another faculty member. If it is a work setting, I would recommend consulting with someone from a professional organization who can serve as an objective third party.

  52. Emilee permalink
    March 21, 2011 9:58 pm

    It seems that the inconsistant attendance may be an ideal problem to apply the PST. As you stated, many of the group members could not attend due to symptom flare ups, what are your thoughts of using technology to reach out to these members who could not attend in person? Would the option of technological asssistance via emails, video chat, or homework assignments foster the groups cohesion and address the art-based PST cirriculum?

    • Emilee permalink
      March 21, 2011 10:50 pm

      The above above question is for Dr. Barbara Parker-Bell

  53. Emilee permalink
    March 21, 2011 10:28 pm

    Early in your abstract you state:

    “The idea of multiple personality develops in psychotherapy practice which give an assumption that a person’s psychological well-being is determined by the peculiarities of one’s auto-communication or internal dialogue.”

    Are you saying that a person suffering a high rate of peculiarities of auto-communication may also be suffering from a mental disorder of multiple personalities? If so, what are your options on the function of auto-communication in a patient with Schizophrenia?

    • Emilee permalink
      March 21, 2011 10:49 pm

      The above question is for Dr. Matsuta

  54. March 21, 2011 10:31 pm

    Dr. Matusa,

    I find this topic very interesting… autocommunication is helpful techinique for many in helping with personal growth and awareness . Would something such as this be useful with patients/clients with schizophrenia?

  55. Emilee permalink
    March 21, 2011 10:45 pm

    Do you feel that a change in educational cirriculum for both fields would be beneficial to developing a more interdisciplinary approach to computer technology? Such as, requiring computer scientist to take psychology courses and psycholoist to take a computer science course?

    • Emilee permalink
      March 21, 2011 10:47 pm

      This question is for Dr. Balanev

  56. Clarissa permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:06 am

    Dr. Janey,
    In your paper, you stressed the importance of a good relationship between the supervisor and the supervisee. But, from what I understand, most don’t get to pick and choose whom they work with, and therefore may have to, at times, work with people they don’t usually get along with or might not agree with. Since it’s important that this relationship work for the betterment of the client, what advice would you give in these situations? What are the “must-haves” for a supervision relationship to work?

  57. Paul permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:29 am

    Dr. Matsuta,
    You stated that some respondents do not want to be alone with themselves because of their fear to get clear that their real life differs from their dreams and goals. Is it really avoidable, or would they need to be dellusional to avoid such reality?

    How is autocommunication encouraged? What are the questions or techniques used to nurture autocomminication?

  58. Paul permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:33 am

    Dr. Janey,
    For a clinical supervisor, is their first priority to the clients or to the supervisee?
    There must be a line where you have to let the therapist make mistakes so that they can learn from them. However, a learning experience can’t come at the expense of the well being of the client. Where is that line, and have you experienced any examples of crossing that line?

  59. Paul permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:35 am

    Dr. Parker-Bell,
    Can you talk more about the idea behind the “drop in” nature and the benefits you perceived it would provide?
    To me, it seems it would humanize the approach to the research and give it less of a science experiment feel. In counseling, I see a benefit in that.

  60. Clarissa permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:39 am

    Dr. Parker-Bell,
    I was reading your paper through the grid of our recent discussion about disability. It seems that the kind of problem-solving combined with art therapy that you’ve written about might be useful in helping these folks deal with frustrating and difficult life circumstances. I was especially thinking about people with aquired disabilities as they adjust to a new way of life. Does something like this already exist? If not, what would such a program, adapted to this group of people, look like?

  61. Cassandra permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:40 am

    Dr. Janey,

    In small rural areas where clients can easily meet and create ties with therapists outside of therapy, what is your professional opinion on dual-relationships between therapists, their supervisees, and the clients they see?

    • Roland3337 permalink
      March 22, 2011 3:10 am

      Hello Casandra,

      Thank you for your question.

      This can indeed be a problem not just in rural settings, but also in smaller communities within large ones. A useful example from Russia, might be a client, therapist and supervisor living in the same apartment complex, within a major city.

      ACA guidelines in this respect, state that dual relationships should be avoided “if at all possible.” In small communities, sometimes this is not possible, so you are expected to simply do your best, and provide informed consent. This of course includes the therapist-client relationship, as well as the supervisor-supervisee relationship. But there is a bit more flexibility in the latter.

      Part of informed consent in a situation involving the client-therapist, is letting the client know that there should be no social contact, despite the close proximity outside of the therapeutic setting. This may mean walking by them in the same shop, establishing eye contact, yet still saying nothing. To stop and say ‘hello’ and have a chat, could lead others to conclude that the person you’re speaking to, is a client. This represents a threat to confidentiality.

      Between supervisors and superviees, this is a different dynamic. Some social interaction is acceptable, particularly after the student/teacher relationship has been dissolved (i.e., after graduation from a training program). Indeed, some of my most important professional contacts is and has been with my former supervisors. And there is certainly an element of ‘friendship’ when I make these post-training contacts for whatever reason. In this way, contact is reasonably safe, since the supervisor is no longer in a position to evaluate the supervisee.

      If there is an element of evaluation that still exists between the supervisor and supervisee, however, social contact that could become a dual relationship is unwise, could complicate evaluations, and could compromise the relationship. Therefore, it should be discouraged.

  62. Paul permalink
    March 22, 2011 1:42 am

    Dr. Muse-Burke,
    Would you encourage studying, in depth, the religions of the world, or does a broader understanding and concept of spirituality serve as a kind of “cover all” approach? It seems to me that spirituality has a broader spectrum of shared beliefs than do individual religions that clash in their believes. Would tapping in to one’s spirituality be “safer,” in a sense, than targeting their specific religious beliefs?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 1:59 am

      Dear Paul,

      I believe that a blended approach would be the most helpful for mental health professionals. A general understanding of the different primary faiths will provide counselors with a good foundation. Details regarding the religion can be provided by the client, who is the expert on her or his experience in the religion. Understanding the tenets of spirituality, which were defined to be inclusive of all religious and nonreligious people, will provide further information regarding what might be important to clients. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that some clients are religious but not spiritual, spiritual but not religious, both spiritual and religious, and neither spiritual nor religious. Having a solid foundation in both religion and spirituality and their appropriate inclusion in counseling (e.g., assessment, intervention, consultation, etc.) will empower clinicians to best meet the needs of their diverse clients.

      I hope this response is helpful to you.
      JLMB

  63. Cassandra permalink
    March 22, 2011 2:34 am

    Dr. Balanev,

    I’m curious as to where you hope to take/continue your research with computer-human interactions. What are your further plans or studies building off of your presented research?

  64. March 22, 2011 3:33 pm

    Dr. Balanev,

    With the emergence of new technology within the psychology world, does it become impersonal for clients in therapy? Does it take away from the therapeutic process? And finally, what about online therapy and confidentiality?

  65. March 22, 2011 3:47 pm

    Dr. Parker-Bell,

    I find the information about Lupus very intersting, since I wasn’t aware about the symptomatic effects of this disease. I found that the ‘drop in’ concept was intersting since the symptoms of the disease can hinder an individual from being able to attend sessions. How would you further this research to attain a consistent group with this population?

  66. Amy permalink
    March 22, 2011 8:45 pm

    Dr. Parker-Bell,
    What do you feel could be done to make art therapy with the Lupus community more available? How do you feel your research findings could be implemented on a larger scale, perhaps with greater attendence outcomes? Furthermore, because these clients spend a significant amount of their time at doctor’s appointments and such, do you feel incorporating art therapy into the medical model would be beneficial to this population?

  67. Paul permalink
    March 23, 2011 12:57 am

    Dr. Balanev,
    Do you feel that the lack of psychology involvement in current human-computer interaction leads to inefficient programs that aren’t user friendly?
    Can you give some specific examples of the types of computer systems your research targets?

  68. Cassandra permalink
    March 23, 2011 1:14 am

    Dr. Muse-Burke,

    The definitions and purpose of having strong spirituality often parallel the purposes of recovery and therapy. Wouldn’t it benefit new therapists to receive training in a spiritual course underlying these similar aspects and their potential to create a stronger more unifying therapeutic impact?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 2:07 am

      Dear Cassandra,

      Thank you for your question. Yes, I am a firm believer in training in spirituality and religiosity for mental health professionals. Unfortunately, many psychologists believe they are ill-equiped to adequately address spirituality and religiosity with clients, which is detrimental given most clients believe in God or affiliate with a religion. Importantly, a division of the American Counseling Association recently adopted a list of competencies in spirituality/religiosity for counselors. Two of my students will be researching the extent to which psychologists are competent in utilizing spirituality and religion with their clients. Further, my students will be making suggestions for how we might better meet the needs of spiritual and religious clients.

      I hope you find my answer useful.
      JLMB

  69. Cassandra permalink
    March 23, 2011 2:04 am

    Dr. Parker-Bell,

    You stated that implementing art therapy was expected to increase the attendees’ energy and engagement. While it showed positive feedback, how did it affect their energy and attitude?

  70. Rachel B permalink
    March 23, 2011 2:11 am

    Dr. Barbara Parker-Bell,

    Do you ever test a clients level of problem solving skills to be able to tailor their therapy and fit their needs better?

    Thank you

  71. Rachel S permalink
    March 23, 2011 2:18 am

    Dr. Janey,

    I appreciate your statements regarding the different types of supervisors, namely, administrative supervisors, clinical consultants, and general supervisors. In your opinion, is it desireable to have all three types of supervisors on site for the benefit of the supervisee?

    • Dr. Janey permalink
      March 23, 2011 3:48 pm

      Thank you for your question, Rachel.

      The content that I wrote concerning the different types of supervisors was more in regards to making distinctions between work roles, rather than a recommendation for staff in a mental health setting. Probably, the more resources that are available to clients, the more likely they will experience positive outcomes.

      Our concern however, is who is identified as the a clinical supervisor? That person is the one that has an ongoing relationship with the supervisee, as well as detailed knowledge of, and input on, the supervisee’s cases.

  72. Rachel B permalink
    March 23, 2011 2:44 am

    Professor Meza,

    The paradigm you describe is conceptually based. In art therapy, we help our clients to create spontaneous art. As an artist, and art therapist (in training), I sometimes have trouble deciding which modality I’d like to take in order to create something. How do you feel about spontaneous art making and what it might symbolize or represent in comparision to the conceptual, two phase process you describe?

    Thank you.

    • John Meza permalink
      April 7, 2011 5:54 pm

      Rachel,

      The model I created was designed for the applied arts, specifically the graphic design production process. I wanted to give the students a visual overview, and a tool to approach visual “problem solving”.

      Creativity can certainly be spontaneous. The question is though, how well equipped are you to be creative “on demand”. How fertile is your imagination? What are you doing to foster and develop your ability to be creative? One can certainly exercise the brain, like any other part of the body, in order to strengthen it.

      In an effort to develop the students abilities, I have a series of creative exercises I give in class where spontaneity is required. One example is – we play “Pictionary” in class as a precursor to a related assignment. The creativity for this game requires brainstorming based against the clock. “Forced speed creates facilitation” is the premise behind this exercise.

      There are a number of other devices one can incorporate when asked to be creative spontaneously. Alex Osborn, author of Applied Imagination lists nine basic categories for idea generation. They include:
      1. Put it to another use.
      2. Adapt
      3. Modify
      4. Magnify
      5. Minify
      6. Substitute
      7. Re-arrange
      8. Reverse
      9. Combine

      Roger von Oech writes in “A Whack o the side of the Head”, asking “what if” is an easy way to get the imagination going. He also writes about, entertaining ambiguity, looking outside one’s area of expertise for ideas, using metaphors, using illogical approaches, using the rules as a guideline, not to be afraid to play the “fool”, and he also mentions that “play” is not frivolous. Making a game out of a challenge puts one in an uninhibited and more creative mode of thinking. Usually you let your mental blocks down when you are having fun, in turn opening the door for creativity.

      I hope this response provided some insight.

      John

  73. Rachel S permalink
    March 23, 2011 2:44 am

    Dr. Muse-Burke,

    How would a therapist handle a situation in which the client wishes to pursue a type of religion, or non-religion, that would not be beneficial? For example, a type of paganism that involves dark arts, magic, sacrifices, cult related activities, or just general behavior that would be detrimental for the client to be involved in?

  74. Rachel S permalink
    March 23, 2011 3:11 am

    Dr. Parker-Bell,

    I found the art therapy strategies used in the group sessions, such as the “draw a line” activity and the rock selection activity, to be very relevant to the group. What other types of art therapy activities or directives do you think would be useful in a group addressing problem-solving for those with chronic illness?

  75. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    March 23, 2011 3:19 am

    Comment for Dr. B. Janey

    How would you approach a situation where the therapist being supervised is affected emotionally by the situation of his client?

  76. Rachel S permalink
    March 23, 2011 3:24 am

    Dr. Matsuta,

    I am interested in your statement that autocommunication often arises “when a person’s connection with the world is interrupted.” Could you please elaborate on that idea?

  77. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    March 23, 2011 3:31 am

    Question for Dr. Barbara Parker-Bell

    What are your thoughts on problem solving (negative/positive) as a learned behavior?

  78. Rachel S permalink
    March 23, 2011 3:43 am

    Dr. Balanev,

    I found your use of a PDA in the assessment process to be very interesting because it allowed the participants to interact with the computer on amore human level. What other types of technology would be useful in psychological assessment that create a closer relationship between the human and the computer?

  79. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    March 23, 2011 3:49 am

    Dr Dr. Janet L. Muse-Burke

    How would you suggest to “break the ice” when approaching spirituality and religiosity with a client?

    • Janet L. Muse-Burke, Ph.D. permalink
      March 24, 2011 2:16 am

      Dear Nicole,

      Thanks for your question. I believe it is important to ask the client about religion and spirituality in the first session. It’s appropriate to ask clients if they affiliate with a religion or spirituality and how important it is to them. Additional questions can involve how their faith provides them with support or difficulty, and how they might want to incorporate their faith into the counseling work. Getting answers to these questions early in the relationship can help the counselor determine the extent to which their clients’ faith is helpful and supportive, which can be vital during the challenging change process that occurs during therapy. Moreover, by addressing the topic early, it lets the client know it’s okay to discuss faith with the therapist. Many clients perceive faith as “off limits” in counseling. So, a counselor who asks the question directly and early, sets a tone of openness from which the client will likely benefit.

      I hope that response is helpful to you.
      JLMB

  80. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    March 23, 2011 4:02 am

    Dr. Dmitry Y. Balanev

    What would be some suggestions for psychology to be s bigger influence on this rising computer technology?

  81. Rachel B permalink
    March 23, 2011 4:15 am

    Dr. Balanev,

    I am not familiar with the computer experimental and psycho diagnostic assessment programs. In what instance would you use one? How does this program work as far as what type of data to enter in order to get results? Please explain what you would expect to get from the results.

    Spacibo.

  82. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    March 23, 2011 4:16 am

    Dr. Valeria Matsuta

    Do you think that art therapy could be used as a method to help quantify and qualify autocomunication?

  83. Rachel B permalink
    March 23, 2011 4:22 am

    Dr. Matsuta,

    If I am understanding your research correctly, it seems as though autocommunication in psychological practice would make sense to pair with art therapy in the same therapy session since it “bypasses” psychological defenses. Have you thought about this before and what is your view on this?

    Spacibo.

  84. Rachel B permalink
    March 23, 2011 4:35 am

    Dr. Janey,

    You concluded with the fact that the services that a therapist provides to a client highly personal. From my experience, I can say that a supervisor’s supervision is also highly personal, and unique to the individual (influenced by institutional and therapeutic approaches). Even though there are heavy demands on the therapist/ supervisor in the first place, what do you think about supervision courses or any standardized teaching tool, to aid supervisors to give their understudies the best supervision possible? I ask this knowing I will someday be a supervisor myself.

    Thank you.

  85. Valery Matsuta permalink
    March 24, 2011 5:15 pm

    Hello everyone!
    Thank you for interesting questions!
    I hope I correctly understood your questions.
    I’ll try to answer all questions.

    1. “Are you saying that a person suffering a high rate of peculiarities of auto-communication may also be suffering from a mental disorder of multiple personalities? If so, what are your options on the function of auto-communication in a patient with Schizophrenia?”

    This is not about that people with highly developed autocommunication suffer a mental disorder multiple personality. The idea is that psychological well-being of a healthy person depends on how much he is willing and able to recognize and solve the internal contradictions, conflicts. The psychological well-being of a healthy person depends on his willingness and ability to self-analysis, reflection and understanding.
    Some authors argue that the presence in the minds of people of different viewpoints on one subject and the interaction between them can help a person to become more creative, intelligent and adaptive.
    In addition, there are situations in which the presence of so-called “internal interlocutors’ need to maintain mental balance, stress reduction and adaptation to unusual conditions. This is a situation of social exclusion and deprivation. Person in autocommunication and through this process begins to find new social-psychological ways of regulating his behavior in unfamiliar conditions.

    2. “Would something such as this be useful with patients/clients with schizophrenia?”

    I think that appeal to autocommunication, promotion and development of conscious autocommunication can be useful in treating people with schizophrenia.
    However, you should always consider the type, course and duration of schizophrenia. Psychiatrists consider critical to their patient’s condition and it comes through reflection. A conscious autocommunication is impossible without a reflection. Furthermore, it should look at the individual patient. If he has high intelligence a reference to autocommunication will be more effective.
    The experience of my colleagues shows that a combination of art therapy and autocommunication is more effective. Regular practice of art therapy and discussion of thoughts, memories and emotions can lead to improving the status of the patient.
    Patients are beginning to think, conceptualize and fantasize. They have a desire to share their ideas and products with others. It improves interpersonal communication.
    Studies of art therapy and stimulation of autocommunication allows therapists to track the status of mental processes (attention, will). Appeal to autocommunication and art therapy can focus, magnifies volitional activity and focusing on their thoughts. It stimulates the mind and consciousness.
    Unacceptable techniques associated with actualization of the internal dialogue between different “parts” of personality. They only aggravate the disease and can provoke even more dissociation of personality. Especially, “voices” that the patient hears he sees as alien and coming from the outside world. Mentally healthy people understand that these “voices” inherent in themselves.

    P.S. Please, excuse my English! I’m not an authority on English grammar.

  86. Valery Matsuta permalink
    March 24, 2011 5:24 pm

    Paul, thanks for your question.

    “You stated that some respondents do not want to be alone with themselves because of their fear to get clear that their real life differs from their dreams and goals. Is it really avoidable, or would they need to be delusional to avoid such reality?”

    Autocommunication can not be avoided. In addition, consciousness and thinking are communicative in nature. Here I am talking about the suppression of autocommunication. In each case autocommunication can be understood by a person to a greater or lesser degree. Suppression may be due to the inclusion of psychological defenses.

  87. Valery Matsuta permalink
    March 24, 2011 6:20 pm

    Clarissa, thanks for your question.

    “I was wondering, do you think that it might be a good idea to train those people who think that autocommunication is “unnatural” so that they realize the benefits of it? What might that training look like? Can an individual’s autocommuncation be improved?”

    People who think that autocommunication is an “unnatural” process doesn’t have a clue about rules of communication with yourself and don’t know how to do it. Some people don’t know that this kind of communication exists. And they don’t know that autocommunication is a condition of mental activity. It defines capacity for work, mood and human health.
    These people just understand that autocommunication is a communication with “voices”, which is characteristic of patients with schizophrenia. They don’t realize that self-awareness, problem solving in mind, planning and modeling behavior an autogenic training are the manifestation of autocommunication.
    Therefore it’s sufficient simply to show them existing forms of autocommunication in the analysis of their specific life situations in which they turn to these features of autocommunication, though they don’t realize it.

  88. Valery Matsuta permalink
    March 24, 2011 8:00 pm

    To Amy: “Do you feel the creative process can be incorporated effectively into the concept of autocommunication? Can the expression through visual arts be used as a means to further clarify a person’s self-talk and inner speech?”

    To Paul: “How is autocommunication encouraged? What are the questions or techniques used to nurture autocomminication?”

    To Nicole M. Kortright: “Do you think that art therapy could be used as a method to help quantify and qualify autocomunication?”

    To Rachel B: “If I am understanding your research correctly, it seems as though autocommunication in psychological practice would make sense to pair with art therapy in the same therapy session since it “bypasses” psychological defenses. Have you thought about this before and what is your view on this?”

    Art therapy provides opportunities for diagnosis and development of autocommunication. It’s known that projective techniques to bypass the psychological protection. Such techniques as creating a self-portrait are particularly effective. Work on the self-portrait is process and outcome of self-knowledge and introspection. In art therapy you can change personality traits which you don’t like. And you also can transfer these changes in real life.
    A combination of art therapy and reflexive techniques is more effective for diagnosis and development of autocommunication. The therapist can use techniques from different therapeutic approaches. But techniques must be relevant to goals of the work.
    Socrates asserted: “I can not teach anybody anything. I can only make people think.” You can use techniques such as self-reflexive writing, keeping a diary with the following analysis. These techniques make people think. Using these techniques allows a more articulate thoughts, feelings and observations. When a person is writing he faces the need to make a choice from a large number of opinions. That pretty much eliminates the possibility of mutually exclusive statements of opinion without the awareness of this fact.
    If a person has a problem or confusion he gets the opportunity to more clearly define their conditional factors. So he takes the first step towards solving them.
    Self-reflexive writing, keeping a diary stimulates the creative process. Trying to cope with the problem and a written statement of reasons generate understanding of associative links. It opens new ideas and opportunities that haven’t been considered previously.
    It also gives an opportunity to express strong and destructive emotions with a safer way. If a person is able to exhaust on paper it can reduce tension and understand its origin. You can use techniques of active imagination, creative visualization, actualization of internal dialogue and visual metaphors, the method of placement, meetings and assimilation of personality’s parts, which can be found at Satir, Jung and Assagioli. The therapist can modify techniques according to goals and themes of the work. Using these techniques allows a person to become more attentive to itself, to be more sincere and open, to make decisions more responsibly and to understand and accept themselves.
    It’s important to encourage self-examination and to make a habit of questioning yourself. In autocommunication person asks himself questions such as: “What do I feel?”, “What is behind my feelings?”, “What do they tell me?”, “Why is this happening?”, “Why am I in this situation?”. Through the understanding of emotions reveals the meaning of objects and situations which have caused these emotions.
    By answering these questions person continues to decide what to do with uncovering meanings. He answers the question: “What should I do?” This is a question of his meaning. He answers the question: “What am I doing with it?” This is a question of his values.
    Decision about actions of this meaning or in relation to him is based on the meaning and value of the person. Person relates the actual meaning of the situation with his own life context, including his meaning and values, his moral and life guidance. Further autocommunication can occurs as understanding the person’s own values and essential characteristics. He answers the questions: “Who am I?”, “Who am I if I did that way?”, “Does this act conform to my true principles and values?”.

  89. Valery Matsuta permalink
    March 24, 2011 8:16 pm

    Rachel S, thanks for your question.

    “I am interested in your statement that autocommunication often arises “when a person’s connection with the world is interrupted.” Could you please elaborate on that idea?”

    When a person is deprived of real communication and when a person is in special circumstances – for long stay in sensory deprivation or a prison and social isolation or in space flight – a person begins to talk to yourself or imagined partner. Conscious of identity at a mentally stable person is not lost. This form of communication relieves stress, gives an emotional discharge, restoring mental balance and allows a person to adapt to changed conditions of life.

  90. Rachel B permalink
    April 6, 2011 1:53 pm

    Professor Meza,
    The paradigm you describe is conceptually based. In art therapy, we help our clients to create spontaneous art. As an artist, and art therapist (in training), I sometimes have trouble deciding which modality I’d like to take in order to create something. How do you feel about spontaneous art making and what it might symbolize or represent in comparision to the conceptual, two phase process you describe?
    Thank you.

  91. Rachel B permalink
    April 6, 2011 5:11 pm

    Dr. Partridge,

    First, I love your research topic. Second, I would like to ask you how the weather plays a factor on the environmental art you create, or the environmental art others have created – Is it used as an advantage? Does it stop the creation from forming? Does it erode the art over time? Is it used as part of the creation? I am talking about influences outside of the habitat or surroundings in which the creation lives. What are your feelings/ thoughts about this?

    Thank you.
    Rachel

    • Dr. Linda Dugan Partridge permalink
      April 13, 2011 12:26 pm

      Rachel,

      Thanks for your questions. First, in this kind of art, which depends on natural forces across time, weather is accommodated. The artists need to be careful to work with the climate as well as the land. As for erosion, that word has many meanings. Some “process artists” (a different art movement), focus on the object itself and have used the weathering of materials to show changing physical effects. Remediation art, however, strives to stabilize any past damaging erosion that might have occurred to the land—for instance the degradation of riverbanks caused by over-development or industry. In that case, erosion stabilization would be foundational to an overall land design.

  92. Rachel B permalink
    April 6, 2011 5:45 pm

    Dr. Chastokolenko,

    Are all of these creative conditions created by hand, or also in conjunction with technology such as the computer to create fractals?

    Spaciba,
    Rachel

  93. Amy permalink
    April 8, 2011 1:15 am

    Professor Meza,

    In research you talk about the germinal and practical phases of creating art. I understand that the execution of the art occurs in the practical phase. You state that this phase also includes other aspects of production standards, costs, and deadlines. Is this always the case? If you are not creating art with the intent to sell or exhibit it, and rather creating it for it’s therapeutic value, do you feel that these more practical concepts come into play as much or at all?

    • John Meza permalink
      April 8, 2011 3:24 am

      Amy,

      That model I developed is primarily for the graphic design students. And graphic design is an applied art which has different objectives than art therapy. So to answer your question directly, no. The art therapist is not operating within the same parameters as the graphic designer, so some of those aspects of the production process would certainly not apply to the art therapist.

      However, I do believe there is some common ground for all disciplines when engaging in the creative process. It is important to be aware of what phase you are in during the creative process, and what the appropriate mode of thinking should be for that particular phase. Otherwise you may be working against yourself.

      To use a simple metaphor: I think of the germinal phase as sowing the seeds, and the practical phase as the harvest.

      John

  94. Amy permalink
    April 9, 2011 12:07 am

    Dr. Patridge,

    In your research you state that the communities that would benefit greatly from a remediational art project are the most resistant to it. Why do you feel this is the case? Do you feel that with more awareness being brought to the public about the damage that society’s behavior is having on our environment is having a positive effect on creating more environmental art projects? Furthermore, what do you feel could be done to encourage more environmental art and possibly even the creation of a manual that could hopefully bring more funding to the projects?

    Thank you,
    Amy

    • Dr. Linda Dugan Partridge permalink
      April 13, 2011 12:27 pm

      Amy,

      Thank you for your important questions.
      Some communities may be resistant to mixing art with remediation, although the resistance I refer to isn’t the only reason there aren’t more remediational art projects. My specific reference was to communities like Vintondale, PA, that are understandably mistrustful after a long history of being ignored or abandoned by coal companies and governmental entities. The AMD&Art team spent a good deal of time listening at local social gatherings and charettes, and then the community “took ownership” of the project, contributing ideas, time, and hands-on work.
      But there are other reasons that it may be hard to accept solutions that are artful as well as scientific, that use both the left and right sides of our brains. Habit is one. So is perceived cost, although the design components are actually built along with necessary infrastructure construction, thus saving a lot of money. Artist Stacy Levy advises that local community residents be involved and invited to sites even during this earthmoving phase, in order to understand the process and see exactly where the expenses lie. In addition, well-designed art projects entice viewers and users when they are completed and essentially produce value.
      Cultural and public institutions fund environmental art far more than corporations and businesses. Nevertheless, often companies are already funding the arts and sciences through philanthropic programs or are required to clean up post-industrial sites: hopefully they will increasingly fund the arts in partnership with the sciences.
      As for a manual, or a “play-book,” I can only envision one in the most general sense, because projects are as diverse as the artists and the specific features of any given site.

  95. Rachel Baratz permalink
    April 10, 2011 6:44 pm

    To Dr. Vaulina,

    Your research describes psychological influences that prevent the students from embracing the creative process. When you implement some of the art therapy techniques to your students who have never been exposed to this type of creative approach, how do you help them overcome their inhibitions?

    Thank you,
    Rachel

  96. Cassandra permalink
    April 10, 2011 7:31 pm

    Dr. Vaulina,
    I am intrigued with your thoughts on integrating art therapy withing university curriculum. Typically creativity drops during adolescence as new pressures are added onto teenagers and young adults. Any thoughts on how you would like to see art therapy included in schools, and perhaps at an earlier stage prior to entering higher education?

    Thank you, Cassandra

  97. Paul permalink
    April 11, 2011 10:28 pm

    Dr. Partridge,

    Why do you think communities are resistant to this type of art? Is it the cost? A hesitation to change? Or maybe they don’t want to disturb or lose the history?

    How much does politics play a role in these projects?

    Thanks,
    Paul

    • Dr. Linda Dugan Partridge permalink
      April 13, 2011 12:29 pm

      Paul,

      For your first questions, please see my responses to Amy, above. You have both identified an important issue.
      As for your question about politics, any time you have two people or more together, there is some form of “political” relationship. This kind of art actually relies on politics, insofar as it involves collaboration, negotiation, and compromise. However, it also feels the impact of the “politics” to which I’m sure you refer. Probably because her career is the longest and most comprehensive, Patricia Johanson has had many experiences, ranging from being caught in a revolution in Africa to having to wait for U.S. city elections so funding can be released. It’s part of the process (excepting, of course, the violence).

  98. Paul permalink
    April 11, 2011 10:33 pm

    Dr. Vaulina,

    Is art therapy currently practiced in Russia?

    How has the use of art therapy techniques in the classroom been received by the students?

    Thanks,
    Paul

  99. April 12, 2011 12:49 am

    Dr. Vaulina,

    within your research you mention the cultural differences in creativity and style. Can you give an example of patterns or symbols from eastern or western cultures? Are there any specific symbolic images that represent a specific culture?

    Thanks,

    Mandy

  100. Paul permalink
    April 12, 2011 1:10 am

    Dr. Chastokolenko,

    Can you describe a real-life example of a transcommunicative situation?

    Thanks,
    Paul

  101. Paul permalink
    April 12, 2011 1:27 am

    Professor Meza,

    I appreciated your metaphor given in response to an earlier post. Have you found that at times one might get stuck in the practical phase or put too much emphasis there and that could stiffle creativity?

    Thanks,
    Paul

  102. April 12, 2011 12:52 pm

    Dr. Chastokolenko,

    How are the fractals created? What are some of the materials used to create them?

    Thanks,

    Mandy

  103. April 12, 2011 3:04 pm

    Dr. Partridge,

    During the environmental art process in communities are the cultural and historic landmarks preserved?

    Thanks,

    Mandy

  104. Amy permalink
    April 12, 2011 5:26 pm

    Dr. Chastokolenko,

    I am interested in your research on synergy and the effects of 2D vs. 3D perceptions. Can you further explain your concept of ‘stero-effect synergy’?

    Thank you,
    Amy

  105. Amy permalink
    April 12, 2011 5:45 pm

    Dr. Vaulina,

    I am very much in agreeance with your research topic. I whole-heartedly believe that providing creativity to students is a vital part of expanding their views and promoting growth in many aspects of their life. I remember a very “text book” way of learning art, and I do feel my creative process wasn’t as valuable or encouraged during this time. How do you feel this could be changed in today’s classrooms? Do you feel that the technology of today may be stiffling the potential creativity of tomorrow?

    Thanks,
    Amy

  106. Emilee permalink
    April 12, 2011 7:40 pm

    Dr. Vaulina,

    your research mainly focused on that of art therapy in the classroom, what are your thoughts on incorporating other means of creativity such as music, dance or poetry? Do yo feel these art forms have a place in the classroom along side art therapy?

  107. Emilee permalink
    April 12, 2011 8:02 pm

    Professor Mesa,

    In figure #1, are the dotted lines reaching from research to thumbnails and thumbnails to roughs to indicate that there can be a cycle back and forth between these steps? It seems to me, even in the linear paradigm not all ideas can mature from the germinal phase to the practical phase. Do you agree that some ideas that began in the germinal phase but were unable to fully materialize in practical terms would then require a cycle back to the germinal phase?

  108. Clarissa permalink
    April 12, 2011 9:13 pm

    Dr. Vaulina,
    I am interested in your idea of incorporating art therapy into higher education classrooms as a way of fostering creativity. I have, in some non-art and non-art therapy classes, had the opportunity for an assignment to create art, but I have never really seen art incorporated into learning in a way that didn’t tie in with grades. How might you go about incorporating activities and directives that would foster creativity, but be non-graded?

  109. Clarissa permalink
    April 12, 2011 9:38 pm

    Professor Meza,
    I have been in art classes where the professor required us to “show our work” with this type of model as a base – thumbnails, roughs, finals, etc. In those classes, the professor required about a billion thumbnails. I always had trouble with this part, and was going to ask you for what you might suggest to help students who feel “stuck”, but you seemed to have already answered this in response to another student’s question. So, then, my question is, why require so many thumbnails, even if the initial few ideas are really good? I understand the desire to push the boundaries of thought and creativity, but I found that in doing them, sometimes all that came out was junk, junk, and more junk.

  110. Emilee permalink
    April 12, 2011 9:43 pm

    Dr. Partridge,

    It is exciting to see artist, scientist, communities collaborating to find solutions to local problems. The artist seem to have found a way to combine many aspects in their education: sculpture, biology, architecture. Do you feel an increase in interdisciplinary learning in a college art education program would further benefit this movement of art?

  111. Emilee permalink
    April 12, 2011 10:01 pm

    Dr. Chastokolenko,

    In your description of primary art creativity you discuss art practices that utilize the laws of self-organizing matters that exist in nature. Are you refering to the natural organization of natural materials? Or is the self-organization in reference to the persons natural means of organization?

  112. Clarissa permalink
    April 12, 2011 10:27 pm

    Dr. Partridge,
    Thank you very much for sharing your research. As a lover of both art and the natural world, I especially appreciate the combination of the two. I was aware of environmental art which uses nature as both materials and canvas, but not about projects with a goal to improve or restore nature.

    Is there environmental art that does the opposite, ruining the land around it?

  113. Clarissa permalink
    April 12, 2011 10:45 pm

    Dr. Chastokolenko,
    Could you explain a bit more about your psychological understanding of trances?

  114. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    April 13, 2011 12:54 am

    Dr. Tatiana Vaulina

    When you talk in your research about integrating Art Therapy into the teaching process what therapeutic skills do you recommend to acquire in order for the teacher to be more successful?

    Thank you

  115. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    April 13, 2011 1:18 am

    John meza

    When You refer to Plato on learning and living by playing, it makes me think of how much of our society is influenced by technology. How do you think technology is affecting creativity and the production process ?

  116. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    April 13, 2011 1:35 am

    Dr Chastokolenko

    Does your definition of Trans-Art reffer more to trance or through?

    Thank you

  117. Cassandra permalink
    April 13, 2011 1:41 am

    Professor Meza,

    You say that one should remain cognizant of what stage they are in during their creation process. However, some people work well by merely doing without much conscious thought, and going straight into their work meeting all of the requirements. Isn’t there the possibility that always being aware of what stages of creativity you are in might hinder the process instead of aiding it?

  118. Rachel S permalink
    April 13, 2011 1:57 am

    John Meza,

    Though I understand that both the germinal phase and the practical phase are necessary during the production process, I am having trouble seeing the benefit of supressing the creativity in the pratical phase. I feel that a certain amount of creative thinking and problem solving is needed even in the practical phase. For example, “cost” is listed as a practical concern. Perhaps if more creative thinking were applied to the prices of materials used to create a work of art, one could find a way to reduce the cost of materials for their work, such as a different method to achieve the same result or a material that was similar but lest costly. Could you please explain how the creative thinking that was present in the germinal stage could positively and/or negatively effect the practical phase if carried over.

  119. Cassandra permalink
    April 13, 2011 2:01 am

    Dr. Chastokolenko,

    I am aware of the mathematical nature of fractals and the images that can be born from them. Could you explain further the benefits of fractals in the use of arts and creativity with psychology?

    Cassandra

  120. Nicole M. Kortright permalink
    April 13, 2011 2:10 am

    Dr. Partridge

    I’m inspired by your optimistic views of environmental art. Do you think that environmental art will be more prominent in the future and if so what can we do to help that outcome?

    Thank you!

  121. Rachel S permalink
    April 13, 2011 2:31 am

    Dr. Partridge,

    When you discussed the necessity of establishing a good relationship between the artist(s) and the community you noted how important it is to be sensitive and listen closely to the those who live in the area. Given that the and result is not just the artist’s work, but also the community’s story, could you suggest possible ways to involve the community in the planning process and execution of the work?

  122. Cassandra permalink
    April 13, 2011 2:57 am

    Dr. Partridge,

    In your research did you uncover any times where environmental artists collaborated with state departments such as Parks and Recreation offices to create events that included environmental awareness as well as brought in revenue for the area? I would think this avenue might be difficult but in the U.S.’s declining economy and budget it may be something worth trying.

    Cassandra

  123. Rachel S permalink
    April 13, 2011 3:09 am

    Tatiana Vaulina,

    Vishnyakova’s writings on the creative potential of “I am Ideal” and “I am Real” are interesting, but I could use some more clarification regarding the effect of believing oneself is “Ideal”. For example, if a person believes that they are already ideal, would they not be opposed to changing or self imporvement? Could you please elaborate on the concept of being “Ideal”?

  124. Rachel S permalink
    April 13, 2011 4:09 am

    Yana B. Chastokolenko,

    I am interested in your information regarding the connection between nature (natural elements and materials) and art. Do you think it would be helpful to perform therapy or engage in art therapy in a more natural environment rather than in an office setting or community building?

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